Beware!
For those of you that live in high rise buildings, please try to keep your cats off the outer window ledge!
It isn’t difficult to see the problem, the femur has fractured into about 5 different pieces. The cat recovered followed some major surgery using pins and an external skeletal fixator. 

Beware!

For those of you that live in high rise buildings, please try to keep your cats off the outer window ledge!

It isn’t difficult to see the problem, the femur has fractured into about 5 different pieces. The cat recovered followed some major surgery using pins and an external skeletal fixator. 

…And the job hunt starts!
Exciting times, wish me luck!
On another note - thanks for supporting me guys, your questions have been invaluable, I have met some really great people and it’s great to know people enjoy learning about a vets world! x (Plus no-one likes talking to themselves, at least not all the time)

…And the job hunt starts!

Exciting times, wish me luck!

On another note - thanks for supporting me guys, your questions have been invaluable, I have met some really great people and it’s great to know people enjoy learning about a vets world! x (Plus no-one likes talking to themselves, at least not all the time)

Silage Eye
The bacteria causing this condition (Listeria monocytogenes) is commonly found in a type of food (silage, hence the name!) that the cows are eating.
Silage is made by fermenting grass (a process that will remove oxygen from the plastic it is wrapped in). This  oxygen free state doesn’t allow Listeria to grow. However when the bales are opened and exposed to the air, the conditions can quickly change allow the bacteria to grow and multiply.
Cows aren’t known to be the tidiest of eaters and some of the bacteria will undoubtedly makes it to the eye and the unfortunate cow can end up in this condition.

Silage Eye

The bacteria causing this condition (Listeria monocytogenes) is commonly found in a type of food (silage, hence the name!) that the cows are eating.

Silage is made by fermenting grass (a process that will remove oxygen from the plastic it is wrapped in). This  oxygen free state doesn’t allow Listeria to grow. However when the bales are opened and exposed to the air, the conditions can quickly change allow the bacteria to grow and multiply.

Cows aren’t known to be the tidiest of eaters and some of the bacteria will undoubtedly makes it to the eye and the unfortunate cow can end up in this condition.

Oops, a picture just uploaded that wasn’t supposed to yet! Sorry!

Something to consider next time you meet a dairy cow!
This data is really quite incredible and I hope it gives you a new found respect for the ‘simple’ dairy cow. If anyone can think of another biological process that is comparable, let me know!

Something to consider next time you meet a dairy cow!

This data is really quite incredible and I hope it gives you a new found respect for the ‘simple’ dairy cow. If anyone can think of another biological process that is comparable, let me know!

Who doesn’t love working with Donkeys!
This Jenney (as opposed to the males, named Jack) had a problem with one of her teeth on her mandible that needed to be extracted surgically from the outside of the mouth, going underneath the masseter muscle (the big one you can feel move at the angle of your jaw when you clench your teeth) . We actually found a rather nasty abscess around the root. In this case we would describe the abscess as peri-apical, peri meaning around whilst apical denotes that it is at the apex of the tooth (the root)
If anyone has any related questions, I have my “professional handbook of the Donkey” sat in my car!

Who doesn’t love working with Donkeys!

This Jenney (as opposed to the males, named Jack) had a problem with one of her teeth on her mandible that needed to be extracted surgically from the outside of the mouth, going underneath the masseter muscle (the big one you can feel move at the angle of your jaw when you clench your teeth) . We actually found a rather nasty abscess around the root. In this case we would describe the abscess as peri-apical, peri meaning around whilst apical denotes that it is at the apex of the tooth (the root)

If anyone has any related questions, I have my “professional handbook of the Donkey” sat in my car!

Chilling!
Every workplace needs a dog to cuddle

Chilling!

Every workplace needs a dog to cuddle

vetstail:

A quick diagram I drew up in a revision ‘break’.
It is a quick sketch I do if I am trying to figure out the consequences of a particular cardiovascular disease. You can easily mark on here a stenosis for example and identify the corresponding hypertrophy. 

vetstail:

A quick diagram I drew up in a revision ‘break’.

It is a quick sketch I do if I am trying to figure out the consequences of a particular cardiovascular disease. You can easily mark on here a stenosis for example and identify the corresponding hypertrophy. 

Cool Tech: Removing an oesophageal foreign body using Flouroscopy!

Cool Tech: Removing an oesophageal foreign body using Flouroscopy!

Canine Megaoesophagus
I hope you can spot what’s abnormal here! It certainly looks pretty horrendous. The massive white area (we’d call it radio-opaque) is actually the oesophagus full of a liquid we feed dogs that shows up on x-rays. The liquid is a barium ‘swallow’ if you’re curious.
There are a fair few causes of this but fundamentally it occurs when anything stops the muscles in your oesophagus from pushing food to your stomach. Food builds up and stretches the oesophagus and in extreme cases you get what you see here.
Some of the causes of this are pretty cool, we can have a look at them in more detail tomorrow. Some of you can probably have a guess what might stop the wave of peristalsis.
Picture source

Canine Megaoesophagus

I hope you can spot what’s abnormal here! It certainly looks pretty horrendous. The massive white area (we’d call it radio-opaque) is actually the oesophagus full of a liquid we feed dogs that shows up on x-rays. The liquid is a barium ‘swallow’ if you’re curious.

There are a fair few causes of this but fundamentally it occurs when anything stops the muscles in your oesophagus from pushing food to your stomach. Food builds up and stretches the oesophagus and in extreme cases you get what you see here.

Some of the causes of this are pretty cool, we can have a look at them in more detail tomorrow. Some of you can probably have a guess what might stop the wave of peristalsis.

Picture source

A case in 4 sentences!
High five to any students able to follow this, if you have anything to add feel free to contribute!

1: 12 year old scottish terrier has a 3 month history of coughing, you examine and find laboured breathing on expiration (dyspnoea), and a grade 3 heart murmur (systolic left apical).

2: Given the lack of systemic signs, no abnormal (adventitious) lung sounds and a heart murmur, top of our list of different diseases (differentials) is compression of bronchus due to atrial enlargement or chronic bronchitis.

3: X-rays show a slight enlargement of the left atrium with lung patterns (bronchointerstitial), a slight enlargement should not induce a cough and although the lung patterns can be consistent with ageing the coughing suggests a chronic bronchitis.

4: Treatment of bronchitis involved elimination of airborne pollutants, cough suppression using an anti-tussives and a bronchodilator inhalers.

A case in 4 sentences! High five to any students able to follow this, if you have anything to add feel free to contribute!

1: 12 year old scottish terrier has a 3 month history of coughing, you examine and find laboured breathing on expiration (dyspnoea), and a grade 3 heart murmur (systolic left apical).

2: Given the lack of systemic signs, no abnormal (adventitious) lung sounds and a heart murmur, top of our list of different diseases (differentials) is compression of bronchus due to atrial enlargement or chronic bronchitis.

3: X-rays show a slight enlargement of the left atrium with lung patterns (bronchointerstitial), a slight enlargement should not induce a cough and although the lung patterns can be consistent with ageing the coughing suggests a chronic bronchitis.

4: Treatment of bronchitis involved elimination of airborne pollutants, cough suppression using an anti-tussives and a bronchodilator inhalers.

Hard at work (Honest!)

I really must get into the habit of writing once again. I have a flood of messages to answer and I’m sorry for not getting round to them.

Hard at work (Honest!)

I really must get into the habit of writing once again. I have a flood of messages to answer and I’m sorry for not getting round to them.

Hello! I hope you haven't given up on your posts and are just busy! I really like your blog, and not only because I'm currently a veterinary student. It's really well built and I think you are a good writer. :) Have a good day. — Asked by yuuge-n

Very busy! I also need to get into the flow of writing once again. I took some time off to go lambing recently; you forget how much of a roller coaster it is.

Anyway, it’s Monday morning and I’m a little morose so I won’t inflict my mood on an audience that isn’t captive ;-)
Joe

Study Tip
Whilst working, Position yourself so that everyone can see what it is your working on or what is on your screen. It might seem silly but I find it keeps me from procrastinating too much!

Study Tip

Whilst working, Position yourself so that everyone can see what it is your working on or what is on your screen. It might seem silly but I find it keeps me from procrastinating too much!

Nice blog! Which uni are you at? — Asked by yorkshireladinlondonish

Hey! I’m studying at Bristol University in the UK. I clicked on your site but couldn’t see what you are studying. Are you interested in Veterinary?

Joe